A Clash Between Cash And Character Among Liberian Youth



By: Martin K. N. Kollie
Monrovia, Liberia

The Perspective
Atlanta, Georgia
March 6, 2015

                  



 
 

The young generation of Liberia is experiencing a serious integrity crisis as dishonesty increases at a high-speed in a small country still struggling to rise above poverty, ignorance and disease. The clash between moral and money in Liberia is gaining prominence very fast as most young citizens continue to chase big pockets and purses in search of survival and better living condition. The moral bank of this 21st ¬†century generation is encountering rapid recession and if urgent measures are not taken to prevent its overall downfall, Liberia might slip into a pit of social, economic, and political extinction.

The struggle to hurriedly amass wealth and gain instant influence among Liberian youth is a common practice nowadays as most of them continue to sell their self-respect for just anything. This insistent attitude of compromising character for cash is so evident to an extent that it has given Liberia an unpleasant image among comity of nations. The campaign to bury uprightness and satisfy short-term goals has taken center stage. This egoistic syndrome is infecting every stratum of our society and judging from existing reality, our nation is gradually turning into a belly-driven society where credibility no longer matters.

As greed takes precedence in Liberia, the need to anxiously harvest affluence is becoming a normal routine especially among youngsters. It is evident today that indignity is succeeding dignity in a country widely known for its ill-transparent history. The semblance of corruption is everywhere and almost every young man or woman is unwilling to cultivate a path of sincerity and honesty. It is not just enough to preach the gospel of generational change through sweet words, but it is important to go beyond its real meaning by showcasing good deeds. The sustainability of any vibrant nation is tied around an innovative young generation whose ultimate vision is built upon great principles.

A huge number of young comrades in Liberia have become professional beggars and gamblers due to their inability to invest more time to hard work and the insensitivity of their government to create an enabling environment. They get themselves involved with unethical ventures which undermine human dignity. It is difficult for good ideas to spring out from within them because they are always seeking greener pastures by hook or crook. They are not willing to make sacrifice and endure economic hardship for even one minute. As a result of this, they usually roam around like dying parasites busy hustling to survive. They have taken this indecent habit as a specialty and what is even more disgusting is that they go about slandering others just to accomplish their naked ambitions. They sometimes appear blameless, but they walk in the shadow of vagabonds and vagrants.

In an unfortunate quest to satisfy their economic thirst, they refer to dishonorable people as honorable. They call thieves as heroes and heroines. They describe exploitative characters as humanitarians and philanthropists. They label warmongers as freedom fighters. They pay homage to rascals. They maneuver everyday to seek unmerited rewards from pillagers and political miscreants. They march in long line behind their slave-drivers day after day, blowing trumpets of deceit and falsehood. Against their own will and consciences, they bend their heads in shame to spread visible lies about individuals they know nothing about. They careless about protecting their reputation as they market their integrity cheaply. They line up their empty pockets to fill them with illicit cash from their paymasters. Surely, they are puppets and charlatans masquerading as champions. These infamous imposters and ingrates are polluting every echelon of our State.

Does Liberia really have a future with this greedy young generation soon to take over? Can anyone depend on this young population for good leadership when it is already experiencing integrity deficit? Will there be a new Liberia of change for generations yet unborn? How do young Liberians intend to make their country a better place when they lack an attribute of trust? How can any young person think about achieving vision 2030 when he/she is making less effort to ensure corruption is fought and corruptors are imprisoned? These are questions that seem very easy to answer considering current happenings.

 

A new era is possible in Liberia if young people are willing to make wise choices. A dawn of a new day can only come if virtues outshine vices. It is mindless for any young person to trade his/her prestige for unworthy benefits. The struggle is not about cash, but character. It is not about money, but moral. It is not about rewards, but reputation. It is not about self, but others. Until young comrades can understand these hard truths and earnestly put them into practice, our country will make no progress. It is time for Liberian youth to abandon self-seeking objectives and engender a real sense of patriotism.

 

In Liberia today, an alliance of blind loyalists is budding rapidly. The society has abundant of pay agents who continue to indict individuals with good reputation into a web of mere fabrication. There is an ongoing spree of character assassination in almost every sector as bootlickers and certified crooks intensify their money-eating campaign. Dishonesty is a common way of life for most Liberian youth as they use their tone so loudly in defense of people with bad records. The primary concern of these gullible foot-soldiers is to bark at anyone who tries to expose their bosses. Every morning they wake up, they monitor and call on almost all the talk-shows busy trying to portray a good image of their employers and tear apart those who have refused to give in to their sinister agenda. They wander from one government office to another hustling every day in an attempt to maintain their false economic status. Due to their cowardice mentality, they appear like modern clowns in some quarters.

What is even more disappointing is that the proliferation of movements in defense of immoral characters in Liberia. If it is not movement for the re-election of candidate X, it is movement against candidate Y. If it is not Citizens in defense of Hon. X, it is Masses for the election of Hon. Y. Even though, there are some genuine movements and organizations whose ideological concepts are based on firm convictions, but many of these self-styled movements and interest groups are money-driven and principle-drained. In this day and age, it is good for people to express their dissatisfaction through protests. This is what a true democratic system requires. It is sad to note that some young comrades in Liberia are using protests as a means of fund-raising and survival. They allow themselves to be used by big pockets to protest without understanding why they are protesting. This fake mode of operation among Liberian youth got to stop now!

The mindset of most of our peers needs to change if our society must make real progress and play a leading role in transforming Africa. It is time for this emerging generation of young Liberian compatriots to refine their worldview and define their role if they must make impact locally and globally. They must reinvent a new moment to protect their integrity against abnormal tendencies. They must reconnect themselves to a model of truth-telling. They must redesign their thought pattern in conformity with moral tenets. By doing so, this young generation will once more embrace an image of respect and reliability. Certainly, they will rewrite a history of great legacy worthy of public honor.

The time to selflessly advocate for youth empowerment, employment, and education is now. Therefore, this government will not take youth-related issues seriously until young people stand up with courage and credibility to demand what rightfully belongs to them. This can only happen if young Liberians unite to fight against unpatriotic practices. The future is ours; as such, we must redeem it from a cartel of high-class tricksters who continues to misrepresent the true character of this generation.

The campaign for change is not about cash, but character. It is not about reward, but reputation. It is not about money, but moral. It is not about possessions, but persistence. The struggle for equality and justice is not about capital, but consistency. Above all interests, Liberia is Supreme!

Related Article:
Liberian Youth in U.S. Find Threat from New Violence

About The Author: Martin K. N. Kollie is a Liberian youth activist, student leader, an emerging economist, and a young writer.  He is currently a student at the University of Liberia reading Economics and a member of the Student Unification Party (SUP).  His passion is to ensure a new Liberia of socio-economic equality and justice for ALL. He can be reached at: martinkerkula1989@yahoo.com


Wallo
Mr. Kollie, I must say,this is one of the best insight I've read on the current status of liberian society. We keep hearing that it is time for the youths to take over,but what are they doing to show that they will be better stewards of the country and steer it in the right direction? Youths of today prefer the short cut to success. They don't have the patience to start an endeavor and watch it grow into success over time, instead they want instant success, or fast money. they mistake greed and coveting for ambition, jealousy for admiration. Instead of self reflections,they are quick to blame others for their failures and misgivings
Wallo at 05:02PM, 2015/03/06.
Joseph Verdier
Mr.Kollie captures the dilemma and challenges of the Liberian youth with much eloquence and passion. The struggle in Liberia is not easy.And is not for the faint-hearted.My generation,now 40-somethings and 50-somethings, went through the struggle to survive and "become somebody" as our people say.It has never been easy.Like the saying goes,"tough times don't last,tough people do." The over-indulgent lifestyle and excesses of the Liberian elite and their failure to create basic opportunities for the Liberian youth has made the "fast track" to success a staple among youths.But one thing I understood early on in my own life and struggle was the danger of instant gratification.Instant gratification is one of the biggest killers of one's dreams.It makes you an instrument in the hands of others.And eventually destroys you.Best of luck Mr.Kollie,as you try to open the eyes and ears of your brothers and sisters.
Joseph Verdier at 03:32PM, 2015/03/07.
rose roberts


A master piece... put in circulation in other newspapers and paper copies to the various universities in Liberia.... Students / youth need to read this.
Don't forget, the fish rots from the head.....An institution build on integrity will promote integrity. As they say "money corrupts"...

rose roberts at 06:32PM, 2015/03/07.
sylvester krah
mr. kollie i am one of the many persons who is sincerely touched by your heart tearing article. i am also convince that this article is a complete wake up call for our dormant young generation. one of the key things i learn from this article is moral principles.if Liberia is to experience any form of transformation we the young generation must be ready to sincerely adjust deplorable morals. it is because many of us have not truly realized the vast potentials in our lives, this is why we have so cheaply subjected ourselves to so many forms of modern slavery called advocacy.i would kindly like to recommend that this article be publish on other webs continually.i am also taking the initiative to begin. sylvester nenneh gebarh boque clabadee krah, student/UL
sylvester krah at 03:08AM, 2015/03/10.
Martin K. N. Kollie
Thanks to all of you and hope we begin to work together in order to transform the mindset and thought pattern of young people in Liberia. It is about our future and those who shall come after us. We must do all we can to demonstrate a true sense of patriotism and nationalism no matter how harsh the conditions may be.
Martin K. N. Kollie at 04:52AM, 2015/03/10.
Sandra
Wow, all I can say is thank you. I am amazed at how my young friends have adopted this attitude of anything goes and are purely materialistic in every sense. Nobody wants education these days.

Thank you.
Sandra at 10:01AM, 2015/03/12.
prince saye
A well written piece Martin
prince saye at 03:33AM, 2015/03/13.
James McGill
Thanks Mr. Zaza for such a well written paper that takes a penetrating look at the problems that affect the Liberian youths of today. My most touching moment while reading the essay was the paragraph quoted below:


"What is even more disappointing is that the proliferation of movements in defense of immoral characters in Liberia. If it is not movement for the re-election of candidate X, it is movement against candidate Y. If it is not Citizens in defense of Hon. X, it is Masses for the election of Hon. Y. Even though, there are some genuine movements and organizations whose ideological concepts are based on firm convictions, but many of these self-styled movements and interest groups are money-driven and principle-drained. In this day and age, it is good for people to express their dissatisfaction through protests. This is what a true democratic system requires. It is sad to note that some young comrades in Liberia are using protests as a means of fund-raising and survival. They allow themselves to be used by big pockets to protest without understanding why they are protesting. This fake mode of operation among Liberian youth got to stop now!"


Notwithstanding, looking at the political climate in Liberia today, these protesters will not stop. It will continue until it plunges the nation into another round of chaos. The behavior of many of the Liberian youths appear to look like a people who do not learn from past experiences. New events often delete the past memories; and that the only way to learn is to be entertained to rude awakenings.

I wonder what runs through the psyche of the masterminds, that are behind the so-called "movements"? Do they not understand that causing trouble by inciting people, will eventually come to haunt them too? Or do they plan on stirring trouble and fleeing out of the country as is typical of the criminal politicians?

The youths of today will one day become Liberia's future leaders. The seeds that they plant today, will be the seeds which they shall reap tomorrow.


James McGill at 12:19PM, 2015/03/17.
James McGill
Mr. Martha K.N. kollie: please accept my apology for mis-characterizing you as Mr. Zaza. It was not done intentionally. Many thanks once again for keeping us informed on matters that concern our country.
James McGill at 03:39PM, 2015/03/17.

Post your comment

You can use following HTML tags: <a><br><strong><b><em><i><blockquote><pre><code><img><ul><ol><li><del>

Confirmation code:

Comments script


© 2015 by The Perspective
E-mail: editor@theperspective.org
To Submit article for publication, go to the following URL: http://www.theperspective.org/submittingarticles.html