Open Letter To President Obama

From J. Nhinson Williams




The Perspective
Atlanta, Georgia
August 21, 2015

                  



 
 
 
 

The President
The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue
Washington, D.C. 20500

 

Dear Mr. President:

Once again, I am writing to you and through you, to seek the full attention of the international community. I do so confident that the United States is the greatest nation of the cherished values that keep our troubled world in order. What is at stake for me and the suffering people I stand for is Africa.  Knowing you as a son of an African who once fought against the evil of corruption and bad leadership in his native land, I urge you to leave your Africa’s legacy as the American president who put an end to widespread corruption on the continent of your ancestry. This type of legacy will resonate with future generation of Africans far better than anything and everything you have done and continue to do for the continent. Future generations of Africans will not remember the value of your presidency with respect to Africa if they are born and grow up in chronic poverty, under-development and hunger, all because their leaders are thieves.

Against this background, I urge you once again to request the United Nations’ Security Council to establish a special International Tribunal for Corruption (ITC) that will monitor, investigate and prosecute corrupt public officials, irrespective of countries.  I respectfully urge you to ask the Security Council to set up a special branch of said court in either Senegal or Nigeria.

I am making this request because the international community and the West are not helping Africa in an appropriate manner. Instead, they (World Bank, International Monetary Fund, United Nations and Western countries) encourage public theft and impunity by continuously providing foreign aid to a region that is far richer in natural resources, but has leaders that are categorically corrupt and bear no consequences for stealing.  

It is important that this special international tribunal be set up as soon as possible because without that the U.S. and other Western nations’ tax payers’ money will continue to go in vein under the pretext of foreign aid to Africa.  Here is why I am making this request, Mr. President.

The U. S. State Department’s Bureau of African Affairs lists four “pillars” as the foundation of U.S. policy towards Africa. They are: 1. Strengthening democratic institutions, 2. Supporting African economic growth and development, 3. Advancing peace and security, and 4. Promoting opportunity and development.

Mr. President, none of these “pillars” is feasible or will achieve any tangible results if the issue of corruption and impunity remains unchecked.  With all due respect, the United States is really wasting its time assuming that things will change in Africa on the basis of these pillars alone.  If you talk to a typical villager in Africa, particularly in Liberia, they care less about the four pillars outlined by the State Department.  What they care more about is how widespread public theft of national resources by their leaders impacts their lives and society.

To help Africa, the international community, the United States and the West in general must focus on stopping corruption in Africa in every form, shape and manner.  Reasons being corruption produces bad decisions; concern over corruption produces indecision. Moreover, the impact of corruption in Africa, Liberia to be specific, is manifested through political intolerance in addition to generating problems of accountability and transparency to social values and justice. It also results in inefficiencies in the operations of these emerging economies. As a result, our entire societies suffer.  Furthermore, corruption destabilizes African countries and endangers the rule of law.

Thank you for giving attention to the issues and problems in Africa as you prepare to leave office as President of the United States.

 

Most respectfully,

 

J. Nhinson Williams
Jones Nhinson Williams
Advocates for Africa Revival 

 

Cc:       President, U.N. General Assembly
             President, UN Security Council
             U.N. Secretary General
 U.S. Secretary of State 

 

Guawon Siasia
Thanks very much Mr. Williams for taking this bold step to make your case to the right authority who controls most of government activities around the world especially third world countries like countries in Africa. However, I became very suspicious of the west about improving conditions for Africans through their respective government institutions. This documentary was on Al jazeera TV where France has been involve in who they approve to be in government in their African Colonies including the President. This documentary is still airing on Al Jazeera today. I am relating to this documentary because I believe what is happening in Africa today relating to corrupt government is not without the knowledge of these western governments as in the case of France. As long as the person in power is in their interest, Africans can cry foul the loudest there will not be any genuine and honest mandate to bring to book those government officials who are corrupt. I believe change of this kind should be iniated by us without arms but with civil disobedience. Other than this, conditions in Africa today will just be business as usual the these western governments.
Guawon Siasia at 08:48AM, 2015/08/24.
Brother Rolo Tumasi
Brother Williams,

While I find your plea admirable and your passion deliberate and true. I must say to myself that President Obama is the President of the United States of America. He represents America's interests as he should, because he works for the American people. It is the American people's tax dollars that pay President Obama's salary.

Why can't Africans stand up, rise up and get rid of corruption? Why must Africans always look to other non-Africans for their survival? Why? Africans, fought hard to rid the continent of colonialism, so why can't Africans now save the continent (peacefully) from all these BIG MEN?

America can help Africa of course, but Africans and only Africans have to do the work to restore Africa. Can't sit around and wait for other countries to come and help Africa. America for instance has her hands full fighting her own battles.

Please remember that President Obama was elected by the American people. He serves the interest of America as he should.

All the best.
Brother Rolo Tumasi at 01:47PM, 2015/08/24.
Patrick Samolu
What a very stimulating and thought provoking point Brother Rolo? Nonetheless, the beginning of Africa’s extreme dependency on the West to make her decisions owes its explanations partly to America’s global superiority. This started when she intervene in World War II to save Great Britain and her allies from the crushing military blows of Adolf Hitler’s military juggernauts.

Hitler’s defeat bred an international culture of reverence; love; hate; and fear for America’s military might. Since that time many nations including Western countries began looking up to America to serve as the global compass when it comes to intractable issues.

Have this policy always worked? Well, the results have been mixed. Sometimes, America’s global interventions save lives and bring about moral and political resolutions to problems. At other times her interventions leave certain regions in perpetual turmoil. For example: Iraq.


Notwithstanding, one resilient factor between Africa and the other nations that look up to America and other Western powers for guidance is Africa’s extreme dependency on looking outside to solve almost all her burning issues including her internal ones. Africa remains an outlier in comparison to other developing countries. I therefore agreed with you on this point.

I wonder how Africans can wean themselves off this extreme and continuous dependency.

What is your take on this?





Patrick Samolu at 07:46AM, 2015/09/23.

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