Donald Trump’s Victory: Will White America Take On Corporate Greed?

By J. Yanqui Zaza


The Perspective
Atlanta, Georgia
November 18, 2016

                  




 
 
 
 
President Elect Donald Trump

Winners or losers emerge after every competition be it a game, war or election. Some winners or losers might not have supported the victor during the election. Also winners might not have similar views, rather different interest. So, although big businesses, on the one hand, and ordinary white Americans, on the other hand, are rejoicing about President-elect Donald Trump’s historic election, big businesses will not cease to exploit them (i.e., for example, Wells Fargo Bank’s 5,200 customers).

Big business, without any sign of giving support to Mr. Trump during the elections, will find it easier to pressure the billionaire in order to increase profits by cheating white Americans. Ironically, white Americans gave the U.S. presidency to Mr. Trump because he promised to ease Americans’ economic pains, including the promise to provide good-paying jobs in the U.S. (Nelson Schwartz, NY Times, 11/13/16). However, economic factors that encouraged manufacturers to relocate from New York State to other states, including North Carolina decades ago might pose challenges to Mr. Trump’s promise.

Mr. Trump is surrounding himself with hawkish and ultra rightwing conservatives such as Mr. John Bolton, Renince Priebus, Stephen, Rudolph Giuliani, etc., which indicates that he might deport aliens, ban Muslims from the U.S., prosecute non-white Americans, etc. The question is can he increase good-paying jobs in the U.S., which might help to reduce bigotry, racism, etc.? President Barack Obama did search for an answer to bring manufacturers back to America. So, he did ask the late chief executive and co-founder of Apple, Inc., Mr. Steve Job how America could entice investors to manufacture in America. The short answer was manufacturers don’t prefer the U.S. because it is expensive to manufacture merchandise and provide services in the U.S.

Why are the costs of manufacturing goods and services expensive in the U.S.? Or why are the prices of U.S. exports high, therefore less attractive? Here are few reasons: the U.S. government, unlike the Japanese and German governments, has limited role in the economy; therefore, has limited leverage over big businesses; the next three reasons are: (1) speculation/gambling cost; (2) excessive salaries and bonuses; and (3) high costs of living (housing cost, tuitions, healthcare, etc.) which flow into wages. Speculation/gambling cost: In 2005, twenty-five (25) United States hedge fund managers received $9 billion as compensation; in 2011, forty (40) hedge fund managers received $13.2 billion; and twenty-five (25) hedge fund managers received 11.62 billion in 2014. (Institutional Investors’ Magazine). Directly or indirectly, U.S. manufacturers include these compensations in determining the selling prices of goods and services. Note, a selling price is comprised of cost plus a profit margin.

Excessive salaries: Other billions of dollars that increase prices of exports are fees paid to Wall Street industry (Goldman Sacks, J.P. Morgan, etc.) by companies. These fees represent the cost of borrowing, merging fees, advisory fees, trading stocks and bonds fees. But the fees have exploded, primarily, all because of corruption. For example, unwilling to inform their clients on fees versus benefits, fifty percent (50%) of the entire U.S. stock market is traded through the “Dark Pool” of Goldman Sacks, even though the company owns only two (2%) of the U.S. stock market, according to Schwall, Flash Boys by Michael Lewis.
High costs of living (housing cost, tuitions, healthcare, etc.): Costs that increase prices of exports are not limited to excessive compensations paid to hedge funds managers, Wall Street CEOs, etc. Employees’ wages, which are comprised of housing cost, school tuitions, healthcare costs, etc., are expensive as compared to the costs of living in China. Although, China is one of the highest home ownership in the world, Chinese homeowners pay minimal interest to the banks, unlike the homeowners in America. For example, a house owner in the U.S. will end up paying $300,000 for a house that was built at a cost of $150,000, the difference going to the financial industries.

Education in America is expensive. For example, a private high school located in New Jersey, U.S. is charging $36,900 for 2016 academic year. Also, public universities in the U.S., on the average, ask for $18,943 per year, but all public universities in Germany are free. Additionally, professional educations such as medicine, law, etc. in America, do limit the number graduate student in order to protect the professional fees, according to Mr. Dennis Cauchon. (USA Today, 3/2/2005). Remember, due to the economic concept of “demand and supply,” meaning when products (i.e., physicians) are in surplus, fees will become lower because patients, not the physicians, will be in control in determining the fees, for example.

If you review the medical industry in Cuba you might understand the concept of “Demand and Supply.” By making education free, Cuba has and continues to produce surplus physicians, thereby making healthcare services less expensive. For example, the country “…has a robust biotechnology industry…” that has generated an innovative vaccine that is sold for $100.00 in Cuba, but cost $9,000 in the U.S. The vaccine called Cimavax does not prevent cancer, but halts its growth, according to Sally H. Jacobs. (NY Times, 11/15/2016).    

If it is okay for investors in education to become billionaires at the expense of society, other industries such as the tire industry, insurance industry, financing industry have and will continue to impede every effort by the government to invest in mass transport. This is because an efficient mass transport system would discourage many American citizens from buying vehicles in America, and of course reduce other related costs. So, you see, that as one industry uses the economic system to accumulate more wealth for a privileged few, other investors will fight to become billionaires at the expense of society.

Sooner than later, white Americans will realize that their economic pains are derived from a structural economic policies; and that President-elect Donald Trump’s promise to provide good-paying jobs in America was a campaign statement. Most importantly, big businesses will not do anything meaningful to reduce the constant rising of prices of goods and services, all because of greed.

jyanqui@aol.com


Kandajaba Zoebohn Zoedjallah
Let see what happens!
Kandajaba Zoebohn Zoedjallah at 09:10AM, 2016/11/18.
Sylvester Moses
Thoughtful, and thought - provoking, but for heaven's sake, I hope the conclusion is wrong. Hitler started scapegoating German Jews when his rosy economic forecasts started tanking - hence the need for territorial expansion, and, of course, wars.
Sylvester Moses at 10:29AM, 2016/11/19.
martin scott
Comrade J. Nikita Zaza

Can you please tell us your definition of "Greed"??.... Why?

Because we all know that you're a black liar, and your definition of words like "trade", "exploit", and "steal" an have entirely different meaning from their dictionary definitions.

For example, Merriam-Webster dictionary defines "Greed" as "a selfish and excessive desire for more of something (as money) than is needed."

Is that your definition of "greed" too? If so, then how do YOU know what a person really needs?

Based on that definition, would you consider my mother-in-law to be GREEDY because she has more than 200 pairs of shoes?? Is her desire for shoes excessive??

How about LeBron James, the basketball player, who earns US$77.2 million; Lionel Messi, the soccer star, who earns US$81.4 million' and Kevn Hart, comedian, who earns US$87.5 million--in 2016?

Do you consider their salaries excessive?? Also, do you consider them GREEDY? If not, why not?

I'm dying to hear from you, Comrade.

In the cause of the people, the struggle continues
martin scott at 07:00PM, 2016/11/20.
j. yanqui

Hi Mr. SYLVESTER MOSES and Mr. MARTIN SCOTT,

I am sorry if you think that my conclusion is pessimistic. However, economic variables should be used in making economic judgement.

For my good friend, Mr. Scott, I am sure you will agree with me that the request made by the Italian Bank asking the businessman to borrow $600,000 (i.e., $300,000 for his business and $300,000 to buy the bank's stocks was based on greed.

Interestingly, Mr. Scott did not use the names of any of the chief executives of hedge funds to argue, rather, he used individuals who earned their wages based on their talents. For example, it was based on greed and connection that created a financial opportunity for Mr. John Paulson to have made $20 billion for his hedge fund and $4 billion for himself. He did receive information from Ms. Meredith Whitney during the 2008 financial crisis, according to a book called "The Big Short" by Michael Lewis. Ms. Whitney was an analyst of a financial firm called Oppenheimer.

I have posted some statements of an article in the 11/20/2016 New York Times about an economic story called " EUROPE'S ITALY PROBLEM: SQUEEZED BY BAD LOANS, ITALIAN BANKS ARE STARVING THE COUNTRY…" for your reading:



1) “I had to face ignorant people,” Mr. Rossi said, fuming. “They refused me the loan.”

Desperate, Mr. Rossi tried another bank, Veneto Banca. Its bankers were prepared to extend a loan — with one major catch.

“They said, ‘You need €300,000. We are prepared to give you €600,000,’” Mr. Rossi recalled. “‘But you have to take the extra €300,000 and buy the bank’s stock.’”

That would have doubled his payments while placing a sizable bet on a dicey bank. If it failed, he would still be responsible for the loan. This seemed dangerous and unsavory.

1.1) Yet in the telling of some economists, the reforms are a sideshow: The trouble lies with the banks. They prop up so-called zombie companies that will never repay their loans, extending just enough credit to keep them current on their debts.


A) MILAN — Victor Massiah has grown weary of talk that the Italian banking system is so threadbare and stuffed with terrible loans that it threatens Europe with another financial crisis.

B) The mansion that serves as local headquarters for the bank he runs, UBI Banca, one of Italy’s largest lenders, does not feel like a place on the verge of running out of money. An inlaid marble fireplace sits in a conference room beneath wooden beams worthy of a castle. A statue of the Greek goddess Athena stands triumphantly over a staircase.


C) Among policy makers alert for signs of the next financial disaster, Italy’s mountain of uncollectable bank debt is a subject discussed in tones ordinarily reserved for piles of plutonium. Its banks seem at once too big to fail and eminently capable of doing so, menacing the global economy.



D) Italy’s problems are Europe’s problems. Nearly one-fifth of all loans in the Italian banking system are classified as troubled, a toll worth 360 billion euros, or nearly $400 billion, at the end of last year, according to the International Monetary Fund. That represents roughly 40 percent of all the bad loans within the countries sharing the euro.



E) All of which leaves Italy and Europe, and to some extent the global economy, with a formidable conundrum. Europe may never regain economic vigor so long as Italy’s banks are a slow-motion emergency. But Italy’s banks cannot get healthy without growth. And Italy’s economy can’t grow without healthy banks.

F) Family-run craft and apparel makers have been destroyed by low-cost competition from China. Negative interest rates maintained by the European Central Bank to encourage lending have cut into bank profit margins.



G) Stefana’s business has disintegrated in the face of a global glut of steel and the disappearance of construction projects in Italy and Spain. In late 2014, workers began hearing that management was having difficulty paying for gas and electricity. For two weeks, the plant shut down, then work resumed.



H) Most of the workers used to earn about 1,800 euros a month (about $1,964), plus pension and other benefits. Now they get half that via state aid and a local emergency fund. The company sits in legal limbo as a judge sifts through claims from creditors.


I) “I have to have lunch with my mother,” said Mr. Stefana, who frequently goes home for meals as a way to save money. “It’s not the right reason to eat with your parents.”









j. yanqui at 12:12AM, 2016/11/21.
martin scott
Comrade J. Nikita Zaza,

If you can't tell me your definition of "greed", then there's no point debating the issue of greed. I don't want to spend my time talking past each other.
martin scott at 11:32PM, 2016/11/21.
Kandajaba Zoebohn Zoedjallah
Martin Scott, greed is when Ellen Johnson Sirleaf selects her son to head NOCAL and he ends up with 2.5 billion U.S. Dollars as reported by the FBI, and NOCAL collapses.

Greed is when Ellen Johnson Sirleaf attempts to impose her incompetent son Robert Sirleaf on the Liberian nation as Senator, and eventually as President.

Greed is when she attempts to make her son Governor of the Central Bank of Liberia. Greed is when U.S. multinationals are bent on sitting on more than 2 trillion US Dollars in cash outside the U.S. WHILE THAT AMOUNT COULD BE INVESTED IN DOMESTIC INVESTMENTS.

And this is what we believe Mr. J. Yanqui Zaza is talking about, and not your senseless talk about salaries of talented artists or athletes who earned their money via their sweat!

Greed is when Martin Scott chooses to be a paid agent of Ellen Johnson Sirleaf to write nonesense in defense of her corrupt modus operandi!

Now take this into your shelled skull!
Kandajaba Zoebohn Zoedjallah at 05:36AM, 2016/11/23.
Kandajaba Zoebohn Zoedjallah
And the inquiry or the title of Mr. Zaza´s views and opinions : Will White America Take On Corporate Greed? IS HIGHLY LEGITIMATE AND INTELLECTUALLY SOUND AND TRUE!

For in an election in which the people have made IT clear that they are fed-up with a corrupt, self-dealing political establishment where democracy has been defined as "from father to son to brother" (the Bush family) or "from husband to wife" (Bill Clinton to his wife Hilary,:

the inquiry or the title of Mr. Zaza´s views and opinions : Will White America Take On Corporate Greed? IS HIGHLY LEGITIMATE AND INTELLECTUALLY SOUND AND TRUE!


For this is WHY the people rose up to tear apart and trash such political decay even via a radical outsider (Donald Trump) in whom they envisage hopes in putting to a final end this POLITICAL GREED!
Kandajaba Zoebohn Zoedjallah at 05:26AM, 2016/11/24.
Kou Gontee
There she goes again! The last time she announced to the world that "prostitution was not illegal in Liberia"!

This time, she is saying that: our countryś tradition, customs, culture, and values are associated with sodomy!

"No law legalizes or bans homosexuality in Liberia; however, it is still seen as a taboo in Liberia." culled form FrontpageAfricaonline

“Liberia has no law that restricts the rights of individuals to their own choices,” she said in response to a Canadian journalist who asked what was her government doing to protect members of the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community (LGBT).

“Only when it is a threat to national security do we have a law that has restrictions,” she added.

“The freedom of choice is extended to all Liberians.”

"President Sirleaf’s comment sound different from her previous stance on gay right. She’s on record for saying during a press conference in 2012." Frontpageafricaonline.com

Just the other day she said:

“We like ourselves just the way we are."

"We've got certain traditional values in our society that we would like to preserve."

But today she has somersaulted saying:our countryś tradition, customs, culture, and values are associated with sodomy!
Kou Gontee at 03:46AM, 2016/11/25.
Alexandr Lukin
So read out this whole tutorial to know about Showbox App. Showbox App is not available on Google Play Store, so therefore, the Android users have to download the Showbox pc
Alexandr Lukin at 09:38AM, 2017/04/05.

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